This town Thiruvannamalai is situated in 187 kilometers away from Chennai, formerly known as Madras- Capital of Tamil Nadu and there is a railway station on the villupuram - Katpadi rail route. This town stands on an elevation of 266ft ( 79.80 M ) above sea level.

Access :

Chennai ( formerly known as Madras) is the closest International Airport from Thiruvannamalai, is 4 1/2 hours drive by road.

S.No Thiruvannamalai to Distance
1 Chennai 187 Kms
2 Pondicherry 103 Kms
3 Kanchipuram 128 Kms
4 Kanniyakumari 586 kms
5 Kodaikanal 276 Kms
6 Kumbakonam 196 Kms
7 Madurai 334 kms
8 Rameswaram 478 Kms
9 Thanjavur 235 Kms
10 Tiruchirapalli 235 Kms
11 Vellore 83 Kms
12 Udagamandalam 544 Kms
13 Yercaud 526 Kms

Best Season to Visit :

Between November and February is the best season to visit Thiruvannamalai.

Festivals:

Important Festivals
  • An important festival, Karthigai Deepam is being celebrated in the month of November and this festival is scheduled based on the Tamil month Karthigai and normally falls during the months November ,October and December.
  • Thiruvoodal or The Holy Quarrel: This festival is being celebrated during the month of Tamil month 'Thai'or English month January.
  • Full Moon Days: This town draws huge crowd during the full moon days and people from all over Tamil Nadu circumambulate the mountain.

Places to Visit Nearby :

Arunachaleshwar Temple

ArunachaleswaraTemple Situated at the foot of a hill in Tiruvannamalai is one of the most important Siva temples in the south. The Arunachaleswara temple is dedicated to Lingodbhava or Jyothy Lingam i.e God incarnate as Fire. The tall imposing outer gopurams of the temple are a magnificent sight, conveying as they do, an impression of great dignity and majesty.
Among the contributors were the Cholas, the kings of Vijayanagara, the Hoysalas and the Nayakas of Thanjavur. The beautiful thousand pillared hall of the temple is noted for its intricate carvings. During the Karthigai Deepam festival celebrated in November-December, a huge flame is lit atop the hill and devotees flock to the temple and to the ashram of saint Sri Ramana Maharishi which is 3kms from the temple. Arunachaleswara temple

Ramanasramam

Ramanasram Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi, known as The Sage of Arunachala, is widely recognised as perhaps the most unique spiritual personality of the 20th Century. His life was a perfect example of simplicity, purity, equality and equanimity, born from an unalterable experience of supreme peace and oneness. He was a rare, pure channel of Divine Grace, that purposely made itself available to all living beings twenty-four hours a day.

His highest teaching of 'Self-enquiry' was understood in the infinite silence of his presence. Through this silence, countless numbers of devotees and visitors experienced the pure bliss of True Being. That same experience of perfect peace is still available to sincere souls who turn to him and practice his teachings with devotion. This act of perfect grace can be experienced anywhere, but it is especially palpable at Ramansramam in South India at the foot of the holy Arunachala Hill, a hill that has attracted saints and sages for thousands of years.

Sathanur Dam

sathanur Dam The dam here is built on the River Pennar and is situated amidst forested hills. Apart from its scenic beauty and cool climate, other attractions are a swimming pool and a crocodile park.

Gingee Fort

Gingee Fort Nested on three hills, and enclosed by a huge rampart sixty feet thick, stands the majestic Gingee Fort.

The indormittable courage and valour of its erstwhile rulers, made Father Pinments, a priest to call the Gingee Fort the "Troy of the East". Besieged by the Mughals and battered by the British, the fort still stands tall at 800 ft. in height, guarded by a moat, eight feet wide. 

Gingee Fort Nested on three hills, and enclosed by a huge rampart sixty feet thick, stands the majestic Gingee Fort.

The indormittable courage and valour of its erstwhile rulers, made Father Pinments, a priest to call the Gingee Fort the "Troy of the East". Besieged by the Mughals and battered by the British, the fort still stands tall at 800 ft. in height, guarded by a moat, eight feet wide. 

According to tradition, the name Gingee or Senji is derived from Senji Amman, a virgin Goddess. The original fort at Rajagiri was founded by Ananda Kon, the Chief of Konar community in A.D.1200 A.D. and the Krishnagiri was fortified by his successor Krishna around 1240 A.D. Other buildings and structures were raised by the successive rulers of Gingee belonging to the Vijayanagara, Nayaka, Maratha, Mughal, Carnatic Nawab, the French and British families during the period from 1383 to 1780 A.D.

Fortification Walls:

The massive fortification walls of Gingee interconnect the three inaccessible hills- Krishnagiri, Chandrayandurg and Rajagiri. The three hills are disposed in the form of a triangle, while the main wall connecting is 20 meters thick. The top of the three hills form impregnable citadels, while the inner fort contains many fortifications and gates. The Rajagiri citadel  is the tallest, about 800 ft. in height, and the most inaccessible. The 20 meters deep chasm is now connected by a bridge.

Kalyana Mahal :

Built in the Indo-Islamic style, the Kalyana Mahal is one of the most attractive ruins in the fort. It consists of a square court, surrounded by rooms for the ladies of the Governor's household. In the middle of this court, is a 27 metre high square tower, built of stone. The tower has a pyramidal roof. The rooms in this tower are very similar to the Vijayanagar Nayaka buildings elsewhere

Kalyana Mahal

Barracks and Stables :

A series of low vaulted and arched cells on the western side of the Kalyana Mahal are referred to as the Barracks and Stables. The Archaeological Conservation Training camp is located here.

Granary and Gymnasium:

This is the largest granary built in stone with a spacious entrance passage. The walls are nearly 2 metres thick. The stucco decorations outside are typical of the Vijayanagar period. A stone structure, with barrel  vaulted roof, found on the Northern-Eastern side of the granary, is said to be the Gymnasium.

SAD-AT-ULLAM KHAN Mosque :

This mosque was erected by Sad-at-Ullah Khan to commemorate his victory over De Singh and the capture of the fort in 1713 A.D. It is located at the entrance of the inner fort of Rajagiri. According to a Persian inscription found here, the mosque is said to have been constructed in 1717-1718 A.D.

Vekataramana Temple :

This sprawling temple, with aesthetic skills of the Nayaka dynasty, built by Muthiah Nayaka (1550 A.D) is the largest temple in Gingee.

Prisoner's Well :

Situated behind the Chakkaraikulam on the Rajagiri hill, this low circulation brick well is said to be the place where prisoners were thrown and left to die of starvation.

Citadel on Rajagiri hill :

On the top of the Rajagiri hill, within the main citadel are two granaries, a treasury, an audience hall, a huge cannon and the famous Ranganatha Temple. Built in typical Indo-Islamic style, the Audience hall has a domed roof supported by a series of graceful little pointed arches. The magazine building is also a noteworthy structure. Built in typical Vijayanagar style, is the famous Ranganathan temple. To the south of the watch - tower, is a big iron Cannon, roughly 4 meters long, and 2 metres in circumference. In style and form, this cannon is very similar to the Malik-i-Maidan of Bijapur.

 

 

 

 

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